Insurance agents and brokers (NOC 6231)

About this job

Insurance agents and brokers:

  • sell life, automobile, property, health and other types of insurance to individuals, businesses and public institutions.

Insurance brokers:

  • work for brokerage firms, or may work in partnerships or hold sole proprietorship.

Insurance agents:

  • work for individual insurance companies or are independent representatives of specific insurance companies

Supervisors of insurance agents are included in this unit group.

Common job titles
  • agent, insurance - automobile / fire
  • agent, insurance - group / life
  • agent, insurance - real estate
  • district supervisor - insurance office
  • insurance agent supervisor
  • agent, insurance - automobile / fire
  • agent, insurance - group / life
  • agent, insurance - real estate
  • district supervisor - insurance office
  • insurance agent supervisor

Earnings

Annual provincial median salary

$44,924

Source: 2016 Job Bank Wage data

Note:Estimated median employment income based on 2016 Job Bank median hourly wage rate (median annual salary = hourly wage rate x 40 (hours per week) x 52.14 (weeks per year))

Provincial hourly rate

  • High
  • Median
  • Low

Source: 2016 Job Bank Wage Report

Duties

Insurance agents and brokers perform some or all of the following duties:

  • sell automobile, fire, health, life, property, marine, aircraft and other types of insurance
  • establish client insurance coverage, calculate premiums and establish method of payment
  • provide information concerning group and individual insurance packages, the range of risk coverage, benefits paid and other policy features
  • make sure appropriate forms, medical examinations and other policy requirements are completed
  • monitor insurance claims and respond to client inquiries
  • identify and solicit potential clientele

Work environment

Key aspects of the work in this occupation:

  • Work takes place in a conventional office setting.

Job requirements

Education, training & qualifications

  • Completion of secondary school is usually required.
  • On-the-job training and insurance industry courses and training programs are provided and are required for employment.
  • Licensure by the insurance governing body in the province or territory of employment is required.

As of July 1, 2017 when the Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) came into force, you will not need significant additional training, experience, testing or assessment if your qualifications or certificates are recognized by a Canadian regulatory authority. This applies whether you were trained in Canada or internationally. Learn about labour mobility at www.workersmobility.ca. For information about labour mobility and foreign qualifications recognition, contact the B.C. regulator for your occupation.

Skills

  • Social
  • Directive
  • Clerical Ability
  • Manual Dexterity
View skills definitions

Education programs in B.C.

The following program areas are related to this occupation:
  • Insurance

For more information about programs offered specifically for this career, visit EducationPlannerBC.

Select a region to view regional outlook
Vancouver Island / Coast Mainland / Southwest Thompson-Okanagan Kootenay Cariboo Northeast North Coast & Nechako
Cariboo
Employment in 2016:
390
Average annual employment growth:
0.3%
Expected number of job openings:
80
Kootenay
Employment in 2016:
400
Average annual employment growth:
0.8%
Expected number of job openings:
110
Mainland / Southwest
Employment in 2016:
5,800
Average annual employment growth:
0.5%
Expected number of job openings:
1,560
North Coast & Nechako
Employment in 2016:
210
Average annual employment growth:
-0.3%
Expected number of job openings:
30
Northeast
Employment in 2016:
100
Average annual employment growth:
-0.3%
Expected number of job openings:
10
Thompson-Okanagan
Employment in 2016:
870
Average annual employment growth:
3.2%
Expected number of job openings:
480
Vancouver Island / Coast
Employment in 2016:
1,200
Average annual employment growth:
-1.1%
Expected number of job openings:
60

Source: B.C. Labour Market Outlook

Career paths and resources

Career paths

Completion of educational courses through the Canadian Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors allows for various levels of professional designations for insurance and financial advisors.

Progression to insurance management positions is possible through experience.

Completion of educational programs through the Insurance Institute of Canada or its provincial counterpart entitles agents to professional recognition as an Associate of the Insurance Institute of Canada (A.I.I.C.) or Fellow of the Insurance Institute of Canada (F.I.I.C.).

Additional resources