Geological and mineral technologists and technicians (NOC 2212)

Worker with hardhat, reflective vest and rock pick

Minimum education: Diploma, Certificate or Apprenticeship Training

  • Average salary
    70.9%
  • Occupation size
    48.0%
  • Job stability
    60.0%
  • Demand growth
    64.0%
  • Below Average
  • Excellent

Profile last updated: August 31, 2016

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01 Overview

Geological and mineral technologists and technicians provide technical support and services or may work independently in the fields of oil and gas exploration and production, geophysics, petroleum engineering, geology, mining and mining engineering, mineralogy, extractive and physical metallurgy, metallurgical engineering and environmental protection.

People in this occupation:

  • are employed by petroleum and mining companies, consulting geology and engineering firms, and governments and educational institutions, as well as by a variety of manufacturing, construction and utilities companies
  • should have an interest in hands-on, methodical work in a laboratory setting
  • should have strong analytical and observational skills and the ability to communicate technical information clearly
  • must be flexible for field work

02 Earnings

Provincial median salary

$65,384

Source: Estimated median employment income based on 2015 Job Bank median hourly wage rate (median annual salary = hourly wage rate x 40 (hours per week) x 52.14 (weeks per year))

Provincial hourly rate

  • $12.42/hr
    Low
  • $31.35/hr
    Median
  • $53.61/hr
    High

03 Duties

Geological and Mineral Technologists

  • Conduct or direct geological, geophysical, geochemical, hydrographic or oceanographic surveys, prospecting field trips, exploratory drilling, well logging or underground mine survey programs
  • Configure, operate and maintain geophysical survey and well logging instruments and equipment
  • Prepare notes, sketches, geological maps and cross sections
  • Prepare, transcribe or analyze seismic, gravimetric, well log or other geophysical and survey data • Assist engineers and geologists in the evaluation and analysis of petroleum and mineral reservoirs
  • Prepare or supervise the preparation of rock, mineral or metal samples and perform physical and chemical laboratory tests
  • Conduct or assist in environmental audits, in the design of measures to minimize undesirable environmental effects of new or expanded mining and oil and gas operations, and in the development of waste management and other related environmental protection procedures
  • May supervise oil and gas well drilling, well completions and work-overs
  • May conduct or supervise studies and programs related to mine development, mining methods, mine ventilation, lighting, drainage and ground control
  • May assist engineers and metallurgists in specifying material selection, metal treatments or corrosion protection systems
  • May assist hydrogeologists in evaluating groundwater and well circulation and in report preparation
  • May develop specifications for heat treatment of metals or for welding, design welding fixtures, troubleshoot welding processes or quality problems and supervise welding projects
  • May co-ordinate crew members' activities during seismic tests.

Geological and mineral technicians

  • Participate in geological, geophysical, geochemical, hydrographic or oceanographic surveys, prospecting field trips, exploratory drilling, well logging or underground mine survey programs and in environmental audits and related environmental protection activities
  • Operate and maintain geophysical survey and well logging instruments and equipment
  • Prepare notes, sketches, geological maps and cross sections
  • Assist in preparing, transcribing or analyzing seismic, gravimetric, well log or other geophysical and survey data
  • Assist in the preparation of rock, mineral or metal samples and in conducting physical and chemical laboratory tests
  • Assist in hydrogeological field and laboratory studies and in preparation of reports
  • Carry out a limited range of other technical functions in support of geology, geophysics and petroleum and mining engineering.

04 Work environment

Geological and mineral technologists and technicians usually work a 35 to 40-hour week, however, extended hours or shift work may also be required. They may work either indoors in an office or laboratory or in field locations, such as mines, construction sites or wilderness areas while some workers may temporarily relocate to remote locations during field work.

Outdoor work sites can be dirty and noisy and safety precautions must be undertaken to reduce risks associated with field work. Some technologists and technicians perform field work during the summer months and indoor laboratory work during the winter.

05 Workforce and employment statistics

Workforce characteristics

1,400 workers are employed
42 % of workers are working mostly full time

Employment by gender

Labour force by age group

Source: 2011 National Household Survey

06 Job requirements

Education, training and qualifications

Geological and mineral technologists are usually required to complete a two to three-year college program in geological technology, mining technology, mineralogy or a related discipline. Geological and mineral technicians are usually required to complete a one to two-year college program in a similar discipline as technologists. Geophysics technologists are usually required to complete a two to three-year college program in electronics technology.

Professional certification for geological and mineral technologists and technicians is available through the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of B.C. (ASTTBC)

Completion of an accredited diploma program and two years of industry work experience are required for Applied Science Technologist (AScT) designation and completion of an accredited certificate program and two years of industry work experience are required for Certified Technician (CTech) designation.

Certification is available for geomatics, metallurgical and gas and petroleum technical occupations.

For more information, please visit the ASTTBC website at www.asttbc.org.

07 Subject Areas & Training Resources

EducationPlannerBC

www.educationplannerbc.ca

08 Career paths

Mobility may be possible between geophysical technology and electronic technology, and also between some occupations in this group and related fields of civil engineering technology. In general however, limited mobility is available between the different occupations in this group.

09Employment outlook

N/A - Data not available or not provided due to data quality issues

Provincial Outlook:

Unemployment rate

  • 5.4%
    2015
  • 5.0%
    2020
  • 4.5%
    2025

Job openings

  • 30
    2015
  • 80
    2020
  • 50
    2025

10 Insights from industry

There will be job openings due to the need to replace retiring workers, as well as the creation of new jobs.

Employment growth is expected for geological and mineral technologists and technicians in the mining sector as a result of exploration and mining activity. British Columbia's Oil and gas industry has also seen growth in recent years, as high prices increased production and exploration activities.

Demand for workers in the Professional business services industry is tied to a wide variety of other industries, including Manufacturing and Construction. Employment growth in this industry is expected to follow overall growth in the provincial economy.

11 Additional resources