Ironworkers (NOC 7236)

About this job

See what a day in the life of this job is like—watch WorkBC’s Career Trek video about this occupation.

Source: WorkBC’s Career Trek

Ironworkers:

  • make, put up, hoist, install, repair and service structural ironwork, precast concrete, concrete reinforcing materials, curtain walls, ornamental iron and other metals used in the construction of buildings, bridges, highways, dams and other structures and equipment
  • work for construction ironwork contractors
Common job titles
  • erector, metal structure / concrete
  • ironworker, ornamental / reinforcing rebar
  • journeyman / journeywoman ironworker
  • reinforcing rodworker / steel ironworker
  • erector, metal structure / concrete
  • ironworker, ornamental / reinforcing rebar
  • journeyman / journeywoman ironworker
  • reinforcing rodworker / steel ironworker

Earnings

Annual provincial median salary

$70,910

Source: 2016 Job Bank Wage data

Note:Estimated median employment income based on 2016 Job Bank median hourly wage rate (median annual salary = hourly wage rate x 40 (hours per week) x 52.14 (weeks per year))

Provincial hourly rate

  • High
  • Median
  • Low

Source: 2016 Job Bank Wage Report

Duties

Ironworkers perform some or all of the following duties:

  • read blueprints and specifications to lay out work
  • unload and position steel units so each piece can be hoisted as needed
  • put up and install scaffolding, hoisting equipment and rigging
  • signal crane operator to position steel units according to blueprints
  • align and weld or bolt steel units in place
  • set up structural and architectural precast concrete components for buildings, bridges, towers and other structures
  • assemble and set up prefabricated metal structures
  • position and secure steel bars or metal mesh in concrete forms to reinforce concrete structures
  • install ornamental and other structural metalwork such as curtain walls, metal stairways, railings and power doors
  • examine structures and equipment for deterioration, defects or non-compliance with specifications
  • take down structures and equipment when needed

Work environment

Key aspects of the work in this occupation:

  • Work takes place in an indoor environment where temperatures may vary.
  • Work may also take place outside where workers are exposed to various weather conditions.
  • Working with equipment, machinery or power/hand tools may be a source of injury.
  • Workers may risk injury from operating welding equipment.
  • The workplace may be noisy, which could affect hearing.
  • Work locations, such as bridges and towers, may be hazardous.

Job requirements

Education, training & qualifications

  • Completion of secondary school is usually required.
  • Completion of a two- to three-year apprenticeship program
    or
    Over three years of work experience in the trade and some high school, college or industry courses in ironworking are usually required to be eligible for trade certification.
  • Trade certification for ironworker (generalist) is compulsory in Alberta and available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia.
  • Trade certification for ironworker (reinforcing) is compulsory in Quebec and Alberta and available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Saskatchewan and British Columbia.
  • Trade certification for ironworker (structural/ornamental) is compulsory in Alberta and available, but voluntary, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Saskatchewan and British Columbia.
  • Trade certification for ironworker (metal building systems erector) is compulsory in Alberta.
  • Red Seal endorsement is also available to qualified ironworkers upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.

For more information please see the Industry Training Authority website at www.itabc.ca.

As of July 1, 2017 when the Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) came into force, you will not need significant additional training, experience, testing or assessment if your qualifications or certificates are recognized by a Canadian regulatory authority. This applies whether you were trained in Canada or internationally. Learn about labour mobility at www.workersmobility.ca. For information about labour mobility and foreign qualifications recognition, contact the B.C. regulator for your occupation.

Skills

  • Detail-Oriented
  • Object-Oriented
  • Motor Coordination
  • Manual Dexterity
  • Spatial Perception
View skills definitions

Education programs in B.C.

The following program areas are related to this occupation:
  • Ironworking

For more information about programs offered specifically for this career, visit EducationPlannerBC.

Trades training resources

Visit our trades training page at www.workbc.ca/trades to learn about apprenticeship and trades training in B.C.

Select a region to view regional outlook
Vancouver Island / Coast Mainland / Southwest Thompson-Okanagan Kootenay Cariboo Northeast North Coast & Nechako
Cariboo
Employment in 2016:
70
Average annual employment growth:
N/A
Expected number of job openings:
N/A
Kootenay
Employment in 2016:
90
Average annual employment growth:
N/A
Expected number of job openings:
N/A
Mainland / Southwest
Employment in 2016:
990
Average annual employment growth:
0.6%
Expected number of job openings:
270
North Coast & Nechako
Employment in 2016:
0
Average annual employment growth:
N/A
Expected number of job openings:
N/A
Northeast
Employment in 2016:
0
Average annual employment growth:
N/A
Expected number of job openings:
N/A
Thompson-Okanagan
Employment in 2016:
40
Average annual employment growth:
N/A
Expected number of job openings:
N/A
Vancouver Island / Coast
Employment in 2016:
230
Average annual employment growth:
1.2%
Expected number of job openings:
80

N/A - Data not available

Source: B.C. Labour Market Outlook

Career paths and resources

Career paths

Red Seal trade certification allows for movement between provinces.

Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.

Additional resources