Furniture and fixture assemblers and inspectors (NOC 9532)

About this job

Assemblers and inspectors in this unit group work for furniture manufacturing companies and perform a variety of tasks.

See what a day in the life of this job is like—watch WorkBC’s Career Trek video about this occupation.

Source: WorkBC’s Career Trek

People in this occupation:

  • assemble parts to form furniture and fixtures
  • examine products to ensure product quality
Common job titles
  • assembler, bed / box spring / mattress
  • assembler, casket / coffin
  • assembler, chair caner / seat weaver
  • gluer, furniture manufacturing
  • inlayer - woodworking
  • inspector, assembled furniture
  • assembler, bed / box spring / mattress
  • assembler, casket / coffin
  • assembler, chair caner / seat weaver
  • assembler, frame - mirror / picture
  • assembler, table
  • bench / marquetry / productions

Duties

Furniture and fixture assemblers:

  • prepare, sand and trim wooden furniture and fixture parts using hand and power tools
  • assemble wooden or metal furniture and parts using hand and power tools
  • assemble a combination of parts made of wood, metal, plastic, cane or other materials to form furniture
  • strengthen assembled furniture and fixtures with dowels or other supports
  • install hardware such as hinges or clasps on furniture and fixtures

Furniture and fixture inspectors:

  • inspect furniture and fixture parts and finished products for quality standards
  • mark defective parts or products for repair
  • make minor adjustments and repairs
  • record information on products inspected

Work environment

Key aspects of work in this occupation:

  • Assemblers and inspectors in this unit group usually work in a conventional controlled environment such as an office, hospital or school.
  • This work produces enough noise to cause loss of hearing.
  • Workers are exposed to non-poisonous airborne materials such as textile dust, flour, sand, sawdust and feathers in the work environment.

Work is done with equipment, machinery or power/hand tools that could cause an injury.

Examples:

  • operating metal machining tools to shape metal
  • using hand and power tools to make wood products.

Career paths and resources

Career paths

  • Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.
  • Mobility is possible between jobs.

Additional resources

Additional resources are not currently available for this career.